Tag Archives: Donald J. McKim

Lent 2017, day 27

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“This is ‘persistent journey’ talk, not ‘final destination/quick solution’ talk.”
Robert Wilson-Black
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

God grant us strength for the journey.

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

Leave a comment

Filed under Antiracism, Books, Lent, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Lent 2017, day 26

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“Barbara Rossing  has cautioned us not to dismiss this earth, this world, in exchange for a promised new creation because God will dwell here. The new creation will be born here.

“God sees the suffering, violence, and injustice. And God promises to wipe away every tear, to heal every suffering. Death does not have the final word. Resurrection does. …

“What is astounding about the writers of the Confession of Belhar is their unwavering trust in God’s promise of a redeemed and flourishing future.”
Jennifer R. Ayres
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

Leave a comment

Filed under Antiracism, Books, Lent, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Lent 2017, day 24

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“By faith we connect the action of restoration to God’s work through Jesus. By experience, we note that one cannot restore a right relationship that never existed (that is many experiences of women, people of color, LGBT folks, youth, differently abled, immigrant, poor, differently political, and others). Now that we are beginning to recognize through the Belhar Confession that all is not, and has not been ‘right,’ how will I/you/we commit to thinking differently.

“The Greek verb katallasso (‘reconconcile’) could also be translate as ‘to change’ (for example, a course of action.”
Eric A. Thomas
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

What will we change? What will I change? To use Eric’s words (with a parenthetical addition): “How will we (I) create new ways of restoration, partnership, advocacy, and welcome?”

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

Leave a comment

Filed under Antiracism, Books, Lent, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Lent 2017, day 23

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“The Gospel says we are to care enough about the welfare of others to teach and tell them all that Christ has taught and continues to tell us. The Belhar insists that we be the church by ‘living in a new obedience which can open new possibilities of life for society and the world.’ Together the gospel and Belhar pull off the comfortable covers of quietism and push us to engage one another in the interest of attaining peace and justice together.”
Mark Lomax
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

Leave a comment

Filed under Antiracism, Books, Lent, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Lent 2017, day 22

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“… our belongingness to the Lord and to the Lord’s people is the will of God alone, the love of God for us in Christ. To believe this and to live it out in the church’s life requires being born again. Sometimes this means being reborn again and again until we are awakened to the heart and mind of Christ.”
Neal D. Presa
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

Leave a comment

Filed under Antiracism, Books, Lent, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Lent 2017, day 21

“We may personally reject doctrines, attitudes, words, or ideas that promote racism and inequity, that work against God’s love. But too often we avoid the truth that living into Christ’s example means earnestly working against these sins. Too often we remain quiet in the face of situations that work against racial reconciliation, or we may think that by remaining silent we are keeping the peace by avoiding conflict and not making people uncomfortable. Too often we evade the diligent and necessary work to achieve real unity.”
Gail E. Monsma
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

The diligent and necessary work will be challenging, painful, difficult. But it is the only way to life.

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

Leave a comment

Filed under Antiracism, Books, Lent, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Lent 2017, day 20

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“…we must declare not uniformity, but the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace as our primary way of being church and society together.”
Matilde Moros

Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

It is interesting to ponder the Holy Spirt – the paraclete – as a verb. We are given the Holy Spirit to care for us. We are also given the Holy Spirit to live as the Holy Spirit – to shape our behavior.

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

Leave a comment

Filed under Antiracism, Books, Lent, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)