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Lent 2017, day 11

“I love the chance to remind them that Christ’s love is not just contained in their home sanctuary, but that it is waiting in any place they worship, connecting them with Christians around the world.”
Katie Styrt
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

Love binds us together.
Binds us to Christians.
Binds us to all God’s family.
Love experienced in worship.
Love experienced in daily life
as we offer each moment to God.
Love binds us to people in the United States
who struggle with racism, sexism, classism, heterosexism, ableism,
and related, intersecting systems.
Love binds us to girls in Guatemala who died and were injured
in a fire at a shelter where they were locked in.
Love binds us to Shiite pilgrims killed and injured
in bombs in Damascus.
Love binds us
and brings tears
and inspires anger.
May love move me to act.

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

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Lent 2017, day 8

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“We deliberately and intentionally practice giving ourselves to one another because we realize we belong to each other. We need each other. We are inextricably tied together. We pursue this unity like a brutal physical regimen. It is not something we come by perfectly, all at once. It is terribly messy, awkward, and fully human. In many ways, it brings out our deepest insecurities and vulnerabilities if we are doing it faithfully and hopefully.”
Mihee Kim-Kort
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

May I live into unity with all my
mess,
awkwardness,
vulnerability,
insecurity,
and everything I need to be
fully human
and thus
receive faith and hope
for the living of these days.

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

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Lent 2017, day 5

 

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“We are blessed saints by God. Bound in God’s grace, we live within God’s mercy. In God’s mercy, we need to build up instead of tear down. We show God’s mercy to each other through forgiveness. Lent reminds us of the important role forgiveness plays in unity. To forgive others is crucial in situations of conflict, as is accepting forgiveness offered to us. Mercy and forgiveness are essential.”
Grace Ji-Sun Kim
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

May I have the courage to forgive others; the grace to accept forgiveness; and the mercy to forgive myself.

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

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Lent 2017, day 4

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“I love that we Presbyterians have embraced the Belhar Confession. With it we confess the global evil which is also our particularly American evil. We claim our hope that in the church, Jesus Christ’s reconciling work has reconciled us with God and and with one another.”
Steven Toshio Yamaguchi
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

On this Lenten journey, may I embrace the Belhar Confession in word and in action. Open my eyes and lips and heart and arms to know and to live.

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

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Letting my free tag fly

If you follow this blog, or simply wander through a few of the posts, you will notice a fondness, a deep affection, for Northern New Mexico. It is one of several locations where I experience a profound affinity for the place.

When I was scheduled
for a meeting in Albuquerque, I made an airline ticket that would allow me to arrive about six hours before the meeting. The timing did not permit more free time.

As the day for the meeting approached, I began to see the flaw in my plan. I had no way to travel from the airport.

My friend Takako Terino came to my rescue with an invitation to hang out until I needed to go to the hotel. We went to lunch and had a long conversation. Then we decided to take the tram up to Sanimg_4553-800x600dia Peak.

The mountains were wrapped in cloud. While in made for poor viewing of Albuquerque, it was an incredible experience. Disappearing into the clouds and then the mountain emerging suddenly.

A winter wonderland awaited at the top. Snow made intricate patterns on the trees as the cloud swaddled us.

On the return trip, the person driving the tram looked at me and said, “Your hat is on backward. And there is a tag showing.” See the photo.

Before I could reply, the person removed my hat, put it back on “correctly” and tucked in the tag.

As the person did, I thought, “Seriously? I look like someone who cares about how my hat looks?” But I said nothing.

When Takako and I left the tram, I readjusted my hat and let my free tag fly.

See you along the Trail.

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Purple flowers: Old Louisville 3

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4 November 2016
Louisville, Kentucky

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Purple flowers: Old Louisville 2

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4 November 2016
Louisville, Kentucky

 

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