Category Archives: Antiracism

12 September 2021

Walking. Germantown.
Stretching. Gym in the Apartment.
Steve Biko – Beenie Man
Steve Biko (Stir It Up) – A Tribe Called Quest
Biko – Peter Gabriel
Biko’s Kindred Lament – Steel Pulse
The Death Of Stephen Biko – Tom Paxton
Long Walk To Freedom (Halala South Africa) – Ladysmith Black Mambazo
Prisoner – Lucky Dube
Kazet – Mahlathini & Mahotella Queens
Not Yet Uhuru – Letta Mbulu
Tomorrow Nation – O’ Yaba
Hellfire – African Jazz Pioneers
Unfinished Story – Stimela
Biko Drum – Christy Moore
Asimnonanga/Biko – Wouter Kellerman and Soweto Gospel Choir
Tribute to Steve Biko – Tappa Zukie
Nkosi Sikelel ‘IAfrica – Ladysmith Black Mambazo

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Filed under Antiracism, Exercise, Louisville, Music, playlist

Demand Justice for Kaysera Stops Pretty Places


Two years ago, 18-year-old Kaysera Stops Pretty Places (Crow) was murdered in Big Horn County, Montana. Since her murder, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Big Horn County Sheriff’s Office, and the Montana Department of Justice have done nothing to undertake a criminal investigation. We will not stand for this – law enforcement must be held accountable. Kaysera’s family, in collaboration with National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, Sovereign Bodies Institute, Rising Hearts, Elite Feats, and Bethany Yellowtail, are advocating for justice in Kaysera’s name. Help demand #JusticeforKaysera by learning more and take action through the Kaysera website. Join NIWRC’s Twitter Storm on 9/9 and the Justice for Kaysera 5K/10K Virtual Walk/Run

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, Human Rights

29 August 2021

Walking. Germantown.
Stretching. Gym in the apartment.
Walking to New Orleans – Fats Domino
Shelter in the Rain – Irma Thomas
Cry for New Orleans – Various Artists
All Hands Together – Mika Nakashima
All These People – Harry Connick, Jr.
The River in Reverse – Elvis Costello & Allen Toussaint
Where Were You? – Jackson Browne
Hell No, We Aint Alright – Public Enemy
City that Care Forgot – Dr. John
Wading Through – Terence Blanchard
Shelter in the Rain – Stevie Wonder
In New Orleans – Lead Belly
Going Back to New Orleans – Deacon John
I Hope – The Chicks
Ponchartrain – Vienna Teng
The Saints Are Coming – U2 & Green Day
Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans? – Louis Armstrong

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, Louisville, Music, playlist

PC(USA) Week of Action – August 26

August 26 is the day that the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Week of Action focuses on No More Stolen Relatives: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two Spirit People. A short video describes the crisis and invites you to participate in the day.

Here are actions you may take tomorrow.

Wear red. Take a selfie. Post it with the hashtags – #PCUSAWeekofAction #WeekofAction2021.

Follow the day’s events. Find links to more resources in the section on No More Stolen Relatives.

Tell your Senators to support the Violence Against Women Act Reauthorization Act.

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

PC(USA) Week of Action

From August 23-29, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) will observe a Week of Action. The theme this year is “Shades of Oppression, Resistance and Liberation.” Each day will focus on a crisis or issue facing the people of the world. The week is evocative—it cannot cover every issue. The week also points to the breadth of resistance and liberation work being done by Presbyterians and our partners. Events will be both virtual and potentially in person.

All events will be livestreamed on the Week of Action web page where you can find the schedule with the times of the events (Eastern Daylight time). You are encouraged to watch the events live if possible. Livestreamed events will be presented in English, Korea, and Spanish. Events will be posted at a later date. There will be posts on PC(USA) social media – Facebook and Twitter.

Here is the scheduled of themes for the week:

Monday, August 23: Middle East … Our Peace

Tuesday, August 24: Vivencias Hispano-Latinas: Unidad en Cristo AND Systemic and Racialized Poverty

Wednesday, August 25: LGBTQIA+ Resilience

Thursday, August 26: No More Stolen Relatives: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two Spirit People

Friday, August 27: AAPI Resilience, Resistance, Power & Affirmation

Saturday, August 28: Black Lives Matter

Sunday, August 29: Gun Violence Response and Recognition

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, Gun Violence, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), Presbyterian Ministry at the United Nations

Support justice for Julius Jones

Tell the State of Oklahoma to commute the death sentence on Julius Jones.

I oppose the death penalty.
Executing people to keep people from committing crimes has proven ineffectual.
Execution lowers us to the level of those who kill.
The violence of an execution feeds violence.
Execution negates any possibility of repentance and restoration.

And innocent blood could be shed. An innocent person could be executed,

Julius Jones may be innocent. The evidence points strongly in that direction. He has a petition for commutation before the Pardon and Parole Board. This Board can

Julius Jones sits on death row in Oklahoma, despite maintaining his innocence and despite compelling evidence that he may have been wrongfully convicted.

At the time of the crime for which he was convicted, Julius was a 19-year-old student athlete with a promising future, attending the University of Oklahoma on an academic scholarship. It is clear that Julius’ lawyer did not adequately defend him, and that explicit racial bias played a significant role in the process.. For example, his supporters point out that:

  • Eyewitnesses place Mr. Jones at his parents’ home at the time of the murder, miles away from the crime scene. 
  • Mr. Jones’ co-defendant admitted to being involved in the crime and is now free after testifying against Julius. He was heard bragging that he “set Julius up.” Mr. Jones’ co-defendant matches the only eyewitness description of the shooter based on the length of his hair.
  • Newly-discovered evidence shows that at least one juror harbored racial prejudice that influenced his vote to convict and sentence Mr. Jones to death. One juror reported telling the judge about another juror who said the trial was a waste of time and “they should just take the n***** out and shoot him behind the jail.” 

Julius Jones, who is African American, was convicted and sentenced to death in 2002 for the murder of Paul Howell, a prominent white businessman, in 1999. There can be no justification for the murder of Paul Howell. It is a violation. It is tragic. But, an execution will not, can not bring Paul Howell back to life. An execution of the wrong person will also be a violation and a tragedy.

Tell the State of Oklahoma to commute the death sentence on Julius Jones.

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Filed under Antiracism, Capital Punishment, Current Events, Death Penalty

No More Stolen Relatives – #PCUSAWeekofAction2021 looks at the #MMIWG2S crisis

by Rich Copley | Presbyterian News Service

Elona Street-Stewart and the Rev. Irvin Porter celebrate communion on Native American Day on September 12, 2018, at the Presbyterian Center in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by Gregg Brekke)

LEXINGTON, Kentucky — On Thursday, Aug. 26, the Presbyterian Week of Action will focus on an ongoing crisis in Indigenous communities in the United States, Canada, and around the world with a day themed “No More Stolen Relatives: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit People.”

“The day’s events and resources will center the voices of Native American Presbyterians as well as other Indigenous peoples and allies,” says the Rev. Alexandra Zareth, Associate for Leadership Development & Recruitment for Leaders of Color in Presbyterian Mission Agency’s Racial Equity & Women’s Intercultural Ministries. “Invitations will be offered for various ways to engage in the conversation and to learn, pray and act.

“The day will include videos from Co-Moderator Elona Street-Stewart (Delaware Nanticoke) and the Rev. Irv Porter (Pima, Nez Perce, and Tohono O’odham), Associate for Native American Intercultural Congregational Support, that help frame the crisis from a personal place. There will be a devotional featuring a Scripture reading in the Choctaw language, a poem written by an individual who has a friend counted among the Missing and Murdered of this crisis, and a Litany for Murdered and Missing Indigenous People.”

The Second Annual Presbyterian Week of Action, Aug. 23-29, is designed to bring attention and action to people and communities living under different forms of oppression, a response to the PC(USA)’s Matthew 25 invitation and Hands & Feet initiative. It is seven days with online events each day designed to illuminate the issues that the focus group for the day faces.

The Rev. Alexandra Zareth of Racial Equity & Women’s Intercultural Ministries for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) leads communion during the “Gifts of New Immigrants” service on Oct. 9, 2019 at the Presbyterian Center in Louisville, Kentucky. (File photo)

“We hope folx will join the cry of many who have been crying out and naming this crisis as such,” says Zareth, who is co-coordinating the day with the Rev. Mark Koenig, Internal Communications Specialist with the Administrative Services Group. “Our communities have felt the loss, the deaths, the questions, and the lack of action … this is not new to ‘us.’ But it is new to many, and we hope people will understand that we belong to each other; that all pain is shared pain; and that we are all called to mourn together and act together.”

Visit the Week of Action website for information on all days and an overview of the week

This is the schedule for the day (all times Eastern):

9:30 a.m. “No More Stolen Relatives — A Time to Learn, A Time to Act”  a brief video inviting people to participate in the day.

11:00 a.m. “Taking Action for Native Americans” — a short video

12:30 p.m. “No More Stolen Relatives  A Devotional” — a brief video featuring a Scripture reading in the Choctaw language, an original poem, and a litany for missing and murdered Indigenous persons

4:30 p.m. “We All Belong to Each Other”  a short video

All events will stream on the Week of Action webpage. Facts about the crisis will also be shared throughout the day on the PC(USA) social media pages, including FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

Koenig notes that, “an opportunity will be provided to advocate for the passage of the Violence Against Women Act Reauthorization Act of 2021. This act has provisions that will help protect Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit People.”

“Links will be provided to study resources and further information,” Zareth says.  “Finally, we want to empower siblings in Christ to respond to the Holy Spirit’s invitation to act by providing them with facts and statements that are sharable on social media and will help inform hearts and minds in ways that lead to action.”

“The Indigenous communities and their allies who work to address this crisis have adopted red as the color of the movement,” Koenig notes. “We encourage you to wear red, take a selfie, and share it on social media with the hashtag #WeekofActionPCUSA.”

This is an effort that will last more than a day or a week, Zareth and Koenig say.

“Our work for this day is only the beginning of an entire year of focus,” Zareth says. “We want our siblings in Christ to know that Native American Presbyterians will lead a worship service at 9 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, Sept. 22, Native American Day in the PC(USA). Information and action sessions will take place during the months to follow that will continue to inform, equip, and inspire people to respond faithfully and together as a community of faith.”

For more information, contact the Office of Leadership Development for Leaders of Color at  mailto:Alexandra.Zareth@pcusa.org.

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

1 August 2021

Walking. Germantown.
Black My Story (Not History) – Ziggy Marley & The Melody Makers
African – Peter Tosh
Justice – Sevana
For the People By the People – Dezarie
Is It Because I’m Black – Syl Johnson
Black Woman – Queen Ifrica
Hello Mama Africa – Garnett Silk
‘Til I’m Laid to Rest – Buju Banton
Never Get Weary – Toots & The Maytals
It’s Amazing – Sizzla
Slavery Days – Burning Spear
Refugee – Skip Marley
Everybody Wants to Be Somebody – Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley
Too Long in Slavery – Culture
Redemption Song – Bob Marley & The Wailers

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, Exercise, Louisville, Movie, playlist

20 June 2021

Walking. Bernheim Forest.
Some stretching. Gym in the apartment.
Wandering – Peter Kater & R. Carlos Nakai
Refugee – Eric Bogle
Gourma – Etran Fintawa
Running – Keyon Harrold, Andrea Pizziconi & Jasson Harrold (feat. Common & Gregory Porter)
Take Me to Cleveland – Robert Neustadt
Song to A Refugee – Diana Jones
Look in Their Eyes – David Crosby
A Safe Place to Land – Sara Bareilles (feat. John Legend)
The Refugee – U2
Follow Me – Moxie Raia (feat. Wyclef Jean)
In Harm’s Way – Amanda Palmer
Prayer of the Refugee – Rise Against
Coming to America – K’naan
Is This Called Home – Lucy Rose
Refugee – Skip Marley
Lady of the Harbor – Si Kahn
No Human Is Illegal – The Wakes

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, Human Rights, Music, playlist, United Nations

19 June 2021

Treadmill. Gym at Germantown Mill Lofts.
Stretching. Gym at the apartment.
Juneteenth – Suav
People Get Ready – The Impressions
Oh Freedom – Mary D. Williams
Freedom Road – The Blind Boys of Alabama
People Gotta Be Free – Keb’ Mo’
Free – Prince
Free – Deniece Williams
Is My Living in Vain – Mattie Moss Clark
Freedom Highway – Rhiannon Giddens
This Little Light of Mine – Fannie Lou Hamer
Freedom Now – Tracy Chapman
I’m Just a Slave – The Roots
Not a Slave – Dre’ Sr.
Freedom – Richie Havens
Woke up This Morning – Congregation of Brown Chapel
Harriet Tubman/Steal Away – Kim & Reggie Harris
Stay on the Battlefield – Sweet Honey in the Rock
Juneteenth – Cast of Black-Ish

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Filed under Antiracism, Exercise, Louisville, Music, playlist