Category Archives: Antiracism

18 July 2020

Walking. Morningside Park. NK Body Philosophy.
Mandela – Hugh Masekela
Nelson Mandela – Special AKA
Happy – Pharrell Williams (rest in peace Representative John Lewis)
The following songs are by Wouler Kellerman & Soweto Gospel Choir & KwaZulu-Natal Philharmonic
Asimbonanga / Biko
Nomalanga
Different Colours, One People
Mathebethebeni
A Madiba Wish
Mandela Medley
Rainbow Nation
Jikele Maweni
Thula Baba
Lizalis’indinga Iakho/Senzeni Na/Thina Sizwe
Soweto Travels
Black President
Wasiqoqela Ndawonya/Koloi Ena/Sizongena
Voice of Hope

Nkosi Sikelel ‘IAfrica – Ladysmith Black Mambazo

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, Exercise, Human Rights, Music, New York, playlist

A prayer for the Movement

A prayer for the Movement

The bad news, the sad news
kept coming through the day, O God.
The Rev. C.T. Vivian died in the morning.
Congressman John Lewis died in the evening.
Their deaths call to mind the death of
the Rev. Joseph Lowery but a few months ago
and the death of Emma Sanders last week.
Each worked for justice.
Each joined the struggle for civil rights, for human rights.
Each provided leadership to that effort.
We thank you for their lives,
their faith,
their courage,
their love,
their witness, and
their work.
We give thanks that they rest with you in peace and that they will rise in power.
Comfort their families and friends and all who grieve.
May their memories shine brightly
in our hearts, minds, and souls.
As we remember them,
may we also remember
the folk whose names are known to but a few,
but are written in your Book of Life.
The members of the Movement
for freedom,
for equity,
for justice.
As we remember,
may we be strengthened
to be outraged at injustice
wherever, however, it occurs
that we might take our place and do our part
in that Movement,
whenever, whatever that may be.
We pray in Jesus’ name. Amen.

Note: the image of “folk whose names are known but to a few, but are written in your Book of Life” was first given to me by the Rev. Dr. Otis Turner.

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Black History Bootcamp – Day 1

Daughters of Audre Lorde.
Pacing. The Shire.
Through the Fire – Chaka Khan
My Beliefs – Assata Shakur
U.N.I.T.Y. – Queen Latifah
Weary – Solange
Everybody Loves the Sunshine – Roy Ayers Ubiquity
Cherish the Day – Sade
Bag Lady – Erykah Badu, Roy Ayers
I Gotta Find Peace of Mind – Ms. Lauryn Hill

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14 June 2020

Pacing. The Shire.
Daughters of Sojourner Truth Playlist – Black History Bootcamp
Rain – Sunday Service
Let Praises Rise – Todd Galbreath, Anaysha Figueroa-Cooper
It Has Been Established – Jekaly, Carr
Speak to My Heart – Donnie McClurkin
Spirit Break Out – William, McDowell, Trinity Anderson
Made a Way – Travis Greene
Yes – Shekinah Glory Ministry

It’s Today – Mame (Playbill 30-Day Song Challenge, thanks Sean)

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12 June 2020

Tonight, in response to the evil action of the administration “finalizing a rule that would remove nondiscrimination protections for LGBTQ people when it comes to health care and health insurance”
and even more because of love for family members and friends and people I do not know, it seemed important both to walk and to post.
Walking – pacing – The Shire.
The Greatest – Sia (featuring Kendrick Lamar)
Hands – Various Artists
Love Make the World Go Round – Jennifer Lopez & Lin-Manuel Miranda
Pulse (The City Beautiful) – Zen Fuse Box
Pulse – Chakra Khan
Pulse – Melissa Etheridge
Not Myself – Sharon Van Etten
Raza de Mil Colores – Ricky Martin
I Know a Place – MUNA
Misirilou – Kumbia Queers
Beautiful Strangers – Kevin Toro
Antonio – Bruno Toro
God Bless the Children – TT The Artist
La Yuta – Dani Umpi
I Am Orlando – Alejandra Ribera
We’ll Take a Glass – Grand Hotel (Playbill 30-Day Challenge, thanks Sean)

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, Gun Violence, Music, New York, playlist

6-7-8 June 2020

This playlist covers three days of exercise.

Walking. The Shire. Walking. Morningside Gardens.
California Soul – Marlena Shaw
My People – Erykah Badu
Optimistic – Sounds of Blackness
Glory – Common, John Legend
Ella’s Song – Sweet Honey in the Rock
I Owe You Nothing – Seinabo Sey
Shirley Chisholm 1972 – Shirley Chisholm
Everything Is Everything – Lauryn Hill
Trouble, Heartaches & Sadness – Ann Peebles
You’ll Never Walk Alone – Aretha Franklin
I Can’t Stand the Rain – Ann Peebles
You Brought the Sunshine – The Clark Sisters
A Change Is Gonna Come – Ledisi
Soul Sista – Bilal, Rhapael Saadiq
Rose in Harlem – Yeyana Taylor
The Shores of Normady – Jim Radford
The Road to the Isles – Rob Crabtree
My Head Is Filled with Music – The Real McKenzies
Bobby Kennedy – Black 47
Sign O’ the Times – Prince
We March – Prince
Dreamer – Prince
Land of Lola – Kinky Boots

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Breath, Fire, Witness

101362404_10157797057209440_9130668230082297856_nPentecost.

God’s gift of the Holy Spirit.

Chaos and excitement.

The birth of the church.

Through the years, Pentecost worship services sought to capture the excitement of the day.

Red paraments. Red stoles. Red clothes.

One year each person at worship received a roll of crepe paper—red, yellow or orange. At the appropriate moment, they tossed their roll into the air creating a cascade of fire colors.

Another year we stationed large fans in the sanctuary corners. Turned on when the scripture reading mentioned wind. Some ideas work better than others.

Worshipers were given homemade pompoms with the instructions to wave them whenever the preacher said, “Holy Spirit.” Pinwheels played the same role one year.

A djembe drummer began a slow, soft cadence at the beginning of the scripture reading. The drumming increased in volume and became wildly uninhibited as the story continued reaching a climax when the crowd said in the followers of Jesus were drunk.

Every Pentecost service differed slightly from every other. Every Pentecost service contained similar themes.

Today’s Pentecost service is the most different Pentecost service I have experienced. But those themes remain.

Breath.

Fire.

Witness.

The Greek word “pneuma” that is used in the Pentecost story is related to the Hebrew word “ruah”. In each language, the word is closely linked to wind, spirit, and breath.[i]

Let’s think in terms of breath today.

Breath keeps us alive. Indeed, it gives us life. According to the account of creation found in Genesis 2, God formed the human creature from the dust of the ground. And then God breathed life into the creature.[ii]

Breath gives life. Sustains life. Provides life. It is a reflex process, one of our most natural abilities.[iii] Until it is not. The age of COVID-19 has taught us that.

As the Rev. Angela Denker of Minneapolis notes, “People who die of Covid often die because they can’t breathe, the virus engulfing their lungs and suffocating them. Sometimes a machine breathes for them, for long enough that their lungs can heal and gather strength again.”[iv]

When we go out, we wear masks. They provide a measure of protection to the people we meet in the event we have coronavirus either with or without symptoms. They also offer a smaller measure of protection to us, the person wearing the mask.[v] As we breathe in and even more so as we breathe out, the mask reduces the number of air droplets that may contain germs.

Last Monday we received another startling, sobering reminder of the importance of breath.

“I can’t breathe.”

The Washington Post reports that “On May 25, Minneapolis resident George Floyd was pinned facedown on the ground, in handcuffs, by a white police officer who pressed his knee against Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes. Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was suspected of passing a counterfeit $20 bill. He was unresponsive when paramedics arrived, and he was pronounced dead later.”[vi]

Under that knee, bearing the full weight of white supremacy culture, racism, and prejudice George Floyd died. Among his final words, “I can’t breathe.” The same words uttered by Eric Garner, who died in a chokehold on Staten Island almost six years ago in an encounter that was also captured on video.[vii]

The racism that claimed the lives of George Floyd and Eric Garner; the racism that that threatened the life of Christian Cooper in the Bramble and claimed the lives of Breonna Taylor in Louisville and Ahmaud Arbery in Brunswick, Georgia and Tony McDade in Tallahassee and so many other black and brown people in so many places; that racism has been present in this country since its beginning. Racism has always contaminated the air we breathe. Writing from Minneapolis a few days ago, Angela Denker notes that we cannot ignore the “death in the air any longer. It burns bright orange.”[viii]

Fire.

In Minneapolis and St. Paul, people took to the streets to protest the killing of George Floyd. In Louisville, people took to the streets to protest the killing of Breonna Taylor. In New York and cities across the country, people took to the streets to stand in solidarity, to protest other killings, and to protest the existing impacts of racism on black people and people of color. Those impacts are seen in who is imprisoned; who has more wealth; who has better jobs. Efforts to make it more difficult to vote appear to focus on black people and other people of color.[ix] Racism appears in the age of COVID-19. Blacks and Latinx/Hispanics die in disproportionate numbers of the disease. People who continue to work during the pandemic, often in less safe conditions, are black and brown. “African Americans have been living in a burning building for many years, choking on the smoke as the flames burn closer and closer,” states Kareem Abdul-Jabar.[x]

This underlying reality, when combined with over acts of violence, leads people to protest. Most protest is peaceful. Some is not. Some is met with overt  violence by police. Sometimes agent provocateurs incite and commit violence to discredit the legitimate protest or for other reasons.[xi] Sometimes all that happens at the same time. And sometimes it leads to fire. In Minneapolis. Louisville. New York. Philadelphia.

Angry fire, purifying fire, destructive fire. Different, on first glance, from the holy fire that brought understanding and unification on Pentecost. Yet the hope remains that God, who raised Jesus from the dead, can take flames of death and transform fire into new life and hope for the future. Phoenix-like, from the flames and ash, by God’s grace, new life may emerge.[xii] God does new things. We have witnessed resurrection before. We will witness God’s marvelous acts again.

Witness.

Jesus commissions his followers to be witnesses.[xiii] To bear witness to what God has done, is doing, and will do in Jesus Christ.

Witness, Dr. Eric Barreto of Princeton Seminary, reminds us is not just about our words or even our tweets.[xiv] Dr. Barreto notes that the kind of witness Jesus calls for involves seeing and listening. Witness trusts the testimony of people who have been oppressed, even when there is no video to view. Witness believes people who have been harmed.[xv]

Witness holds the hand and looks into the eyes of someone who is dying, not as a spectator, but as people whose lives are intertwined. Witness also leads us to stand with people who are oppressed.

Witness marches on the streets. Votes with love. And advocates with those who are elected.

As followers of Jesus, we bear witness to an innocent man crucified by the empire. It seems important this week to remember that crucifixion killed by putting the weight of the body on the person’s chest so that the person … Jesus … could not breathe.[xvi]

After the wind. After the fire. The followers of Jesus witnessed. They told the crowd in Jerusalem what they had seen and heard and learned with Jesus. Luke included that long list of peoples and places in this passage for a reason. And it was not to make life difficult for Eric or whoever reads the lesson aloud. It to say that the Holy Spirit is for all the world. For everyone. As Dr. Shively Smith of the Boston University School of Theology, puts it: on Pentecost all “nations heard the gospel preached in all the many languages that … reflect the glory of the God who created and sustains them all.[xvii]

Pentecost reminds us that the God who created the world inhabits the breath and speech of all our siblings throughout the entire earth. God creates a wondrous diversity in the human family. God revels in that diversity. God is present in that diversity. And God is present when diverse people who love and care for each other.

Today we celebrate the gift of the Holy Spirit … God’s breath and fire … that reminds us that it is only together with all people that we truly express the image of God. We receive inspiration to witness to that image in our words and in our actions.

If Pentecost reminds us of God’s love for diversity and the value of all people then on Pentecost and every day after, followers of Jesus must denounce racism and white supremacy culture and the actions that it empowers. We must listen and learn. And then witness in word and deed to a different world, a world where all are welcome, loved, and cherished. And when we have done that, we must do so again. And again. And again.

The effort to disrupt racism and white supremacy culture and dismantle systems of oppression is not something we do once and check off a box. It is a calling for a lifetime. It is our calling. For that calling, God gives us the Holy Spirit with its many gifts. Touched by the Holy Spirit, we can be persistent, resilient, and adaptive.

This day, and every day.

In the face of systemic evil, the Holy Spirit empowers us to follow Jesus and work to build a different world. I know I will make mistakes in that work. I will fall short. But I know that each time I fall I can pick myself up again, certain that God will have the final word and it will be a word of grace.

Thanks be to God! Amen.

[i] https://www.bibleodyssey.org/en/passages/main-articles/pentecost

[ii] Genesis 2:7

[iii] Dr. Kimberly D. Russaw, Assistant Professor of Hebrew Bible, Christian Theological Seminary, https://churchanew.org/blog/2020/05/29/various

[iv] Rev. Angela Denker, Minnesota Pastor and Veteran Journalist, https://churchanew.org/blog/2020/05/29/various

[v] https://healthcare.utah.edu/healthfeed/postings/2020/03/coronavirus-face-masks.php

[vi] https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/05/30/video-timeline-george-floyd-death/?arc404=true

[vii] https://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/14/nyregion/eric-garner-police-chokehold-staten-island.html

[viii] Ibid.

[ix] https://www.aclu.org/news/civil-liberties/block-the-vote-voter-suppression-in-2020/

[x] https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2020-05-30/dont-understand-the-protests-what-youre-seeing-is-people-pushed-to-the-edge

[xi] https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/pkyb9b/far-right-extremists-are-hoping-to-turn-the-george-floyd-protests-into-a-new-civil-war

[xii] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_(mythology)

[xiii] See Acts1:8

[xiv] Dr. Eric Barreto, Associate Professor of New Testament, Princeton Theological Seminary, https://churchanew.org/blog/2020/05/29/various

[xv] Ibid.

[xvi] https://www.theguardian.com/science/2004/apr/08/thisweekssciencequestions#maincontent

[xvii] Dr. Shively T. J. Smith, Assistant Professor of New Testament, Boston University School of Theology, https://churchanew.org/blog/2020/05/29/various

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Filed under Antiracism, Current Events, First Presbyterian Church of Whitestone, Worship

What does God require?

What does God require of me? Of us? Of the white church?
To do justice
to disrupt white supremacy culture
to dismantle structural racism
to build equitable systems
To love kindness
to see and honor God’s image in all people and every person
to practice radical hospitality
to build community that crosses social and cultural boundaries
To walk humbly with God
to listen and learn
to repent the sin of racism
to turn around and do better, by God’s grace

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8 May 2020

Stretching. NK Body Philosophy.
Pacing. 2.23 miles. The Shire.
#AhmaudArbery #runwithMaud
Just Like A Woman – Carly Simon
I Shall Be Released – Bobby McFerrin
Dancing In The Street – The Mamas & The Papas
I Get A Kick Out Of You – Louis Armstrong & Oscar Peterson
Love Is Dangerous – Fleetwood Mac
Songbird – Duncan Sheik
Love Is Everything – k.d. lang
Emotionally Yours – The O’Jays
Sympathy for the Devil – The Rolling Stones
Carried Away – Crosby, Stills & Nash
All Night – Beyoncé
Where I Go – Natalie Merchant
Early Morning Rain – Ian & Sylvia
Pinball Wizard – The Who’s Tommy (Original Cast Recording) (Playbill 30-Day Song Challenge, thanks Sean)

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National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls

niwrc-2020-mmiwg-poster

The issue, from the National Congress of American Indians:

On some reservations American Indian and Alaska Native women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average; and

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, homicide is the third leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native women between 10 and 24 years of age and the fifth leading cause of death for American Indian and Alaska Native women between 25 and 34 years of age.

The witness for 2020, from the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center.

Join NIWRC’s 2020 #MMIWGActionNow Campaign

As we are challenged by the difficult times created by the COVID-19 pandemic, advocates, shelters, and programs continue their tireless and dedicated efforts to avoid disrupting services for survivors. Looking ahead to the efforts to commemorate May 5th as the National Day of Awareness (NDA) for Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls, we are challenged as a national movement to reconsider how best to honor our missing and murdered Indigenous women amidst the pandemic.

While the important public health policies of social distancing and “shelter-in-place” may prevent in-person MMIWG activities, we strongly encourage communities and programs to creatively participate in this year’s National Day of Awareness. We need action now! The National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls honors the lives of our Native sisters and helps shed light on the countless tragedies involving our Native sisters.

The continuing reports of abductions and murders of Native women and girls represent one of the most horrific aspects of the spectrum of violence committed against Native women. The murder rate of Native women is more than ten times the national average on some reservations. Often, these disappearances or murders are connected to crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and sex trafficking.

In 2017, the Montana Congressional Delegation led the way for passage of a Senate resolution declaring May 5 as a National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls. May 5th was the birthday of Hanna Harris, a 21-year-old member of the Northern Cheyenne tribe who went missing on July 4, 2013. Each year since 2017, the national movement to end violence against Native women has organized activities in support of the May 5th National Day of Awareness.

This National Day of Awareness also highlights the need for ongoing grassroots advocacy and changes to the laws, policies, and increased allocation of resources to end these injustices. Individual and/or joint actions at the local, tribal, state, national, and international levels are needed this year. The issues surrounding missing and murdered Native women must be brought into the public’s awareness to increase the accountability of the justice systems. In uncertain times such as these, where people are forced to work from home or lose their jobs altogether, it can put people in abusive relationships at further risk. Public statements honoring and calling for justice for MMIWG can also serve as statements of support for those who are suffering from abuse and violence. Turning our grief to action, NIWRC strongly supports and calls upon Congress to address:

1) the need for increased tribal victim services and tribal justice resources affirmed in several federal reports, and

2) the inadequate responses of the federal and state criminal justice systems that fail Native women.

NIWRC is committed to increasing safety and access to justice for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian women and their children, by bringing awareness to this critical issue of missing and murdered Native women and girls. We believe that we can continue to build strong support and action around MMIWG but only with your help.

Please join us for the following activities:

  • Download the MMIWG ‘No More Stolen Sisters’ poster and share a photo of yourself wearing red and/or traditional attire with the poster using #MMIWGTakeAction, #NoMoreStolenSisters and #MMIWG. Download poster here
  • Access the MMIWG Social Media Guide, complete with prepared social media posts and graphics to download for your use.
  • Watch the Native Wellness Institute‘s Power Hour on Facebook Live Monday, May 4, from 2-3 p.m. CT. NIWRC will join our sisters and LGBTQ2S relatives to share resources for MMIWG. | Watch the replay here
  • Participate in our #MMIWGActionNow Twitter Storm – Tuesday, May 5, from 11-11:30 AM CT. Please use hashtags: #MMIWGActionNow, #NoMoreStolenSisters, and #MMIWG. Download posts here
  • Listen to Native America Calling on Tuesday, May 5, from 12-1 PM CT. NIWRC Executive Director Lucy Simpson will be a guest to discuss how advocates are ‘uniting (in isolation) for MMIWG awareness’
  • Join our #MMIWGActionNow Twitter Chat – Tuesday, May 5, from 1-2 PM CT. Please use hashtags: #MMIWGActionNow, #NoMoreStolenSisters, and #MMIWG. Download questions here
  • Register for ‘Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls – National Day of Action’ webinar – Tuesday, May 5, 2-3:30 PM CT | Register here
  • Watch the United State of Women #StateOfWomenTV Instagram Live Series featuring NIWRC Senior Native Affairs Advisor Elizabeth Carr on Tuesday, May 5, starting at 3 p.m. CT.
  • Tag the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram in your efforts to raise awareness for MMIWG.

Thank you for your continued support, participation, and for the work that you do in each of your communities to raise awareness for missing and murdered Native women and girls.

#REDdress #MMIWG #MMNAWG #gonebutnotforgotten

 

 

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