Monthly Archives: March 2012

Two towers, Broadway style

It has nothing to do with Tolkien.
No rings.
No orcs.
No ents.
No wizards.
No hobbits.

But they are towers.
And there are two of them.

30 March 2012

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Blossoms in the gloaming

Making my way up Broadway last night,
the tower of Riverside Church caught my attention.
Without a clue,
I nonetheless played
with angles and
with settings.

Most of the efforts now reside in the recycle bin,
unless they have always been deleted.

This one seemed interesting enough to share.

30 March 2012

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Tulips in motion

The tulip theme continues.
I took this photo of tulips in a planter
on Third Avenue in Manhattan.

I recognize the photo is blurry:
simply blurry:
unintentionally blurry:
blurry because I used the wrong setting
or because I failed to hold the camera steady
or both.

I do not pretend that I tried for this effect.
But I enjoy pondering the illusion
that the tulips are
moving!

30 March 2012

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Tulip after the rain

After the Presbyterian Ecumenical Advocacy Days cruise,
which did indeed last only three hours – sorry Gilligan –
we returned to the hotel.

The rain stopped.
Its aftermath remained.

24 March 2012

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View from the bus

We took a bus to the boat for the Presbyterian cruise
during Ecumenical Advocacy Days.

It rained.

24 March 2012

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Book, candle, no bell

At Ecumenical Advocacy Days, I became the quasi-official Presbyterian photographer,
taking photos at the Compassion, Peace and Justice Training Day,
during Ecumenical Advocacy Days itself,
and even on the cruise.

I snapped this photo during a workshop led by
Rebecca Barnes- Davies,
PC(USA) associate for Environmental Ministries.

I have no idea what the photo means,
but it seems kind of intriguing.

At least to me.

See you along the Trail.

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Another point of view

The New York Times posted an article today that contains information from George Zimmerman who shot Trayvon Martin:

In an account given to Sanford police that was passed on to the state attorney’s office, George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin on Feb. 26, said that Trayvon had punched him and then repeatedly slammed his head into the sidewalk in the moments leading up to the shooting.

It is a reminder that there is at least one other point of view in this story. And a reminder of why a full, fair, transparent investigation is needed so that justice can be done for all who are involved.

See you along the Trail.

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Not the answer

Vigilante justice is not the answer.

The Boston-Herald reports that, “Members of the New Black Panther Party are offering a $10,000 reward for the ‘capture’ of George Zimmerman, the Neighborhood Watch volunteer who shot Trayvon Martin … The bounty announcement came moments after members of the group called for the mobilization of 10,000 black men to capture Zimmerman, who shot Trayvon in a gated Sanford community on Feb. 26.”

Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.

Vigilante justice is not the answer.

This way of vengeance fails to honor Trayvon Martin. It further tears at a wounded community. It fuels the cycle of violence.

A fair, full, transparent investigation of the events that led to Trayvon’s death is needed. Such an investigation can determine what steps should be taken to seek justice for all. Justice is the answer.

On the Southern Poverty Law Center‘s website the New Black Panther Party is identified as a black-separatist group founded in 1989, that is “virulently racist and anti-Semitic” and whose leaders have “encouraged violence against whites, Jews and law officers.”

Vigilante justice is not the answer.

 

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Tottering

At times
I totter on the brink
of doing something beyond the realm of utter foolishness,
or saying something outside the bounds of total stupidity:
something that would have
consequences I can perceive
and ramifications I cannot imagine.

I totter –
it would be so easy to cross that invisible, but real line –
it could feel so good (for the moment) –
it would meet so many selfish needs.

I totter –
but pull back,
the deed left undone,
the words choked unspoken in my mouth.

A sigh of relief escapes my lips,
a shard of regret pierces my heart.

25 March 2012
Arlington, VA

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An action, a liturgical reflection – Trayvon Martin

The NAACP offers an opportunity to sign an open letter to Florida Prosecutor Angela Corey who will handle the case of the death of Trayvon Martin. The letter asks her to “to pursue this case with the energy and gravity that it warrants.”

Michael W. Waters acknowledges that:

Symbols have long been important for religious and spiritual reflection. These symbols have been employed to provide greater understanding to transcendent truths, to provide comfort amid chaos, and to inspire the faithful to put their faith to action towards the common good. Many times, these symbols have emerged from rather mundane objects closely associated with a historical event

He goes on to reflect about the symbols contained in Trayvon’s death: Skittles, iced tea, and a hoodie.

Let Skittles, iced tea, and the hoodie become symbols of truth, inspiration and comfort for a new generation of protesters against the on-going crucifixion of innocent flesh at the hands of a corrupt system of oppression and marginalization that has for too long tortured the masses and tainted our country’s legacy.

See you along the Trail.

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