Tag Archives: Mihee Kim-Kort

Lent 2017, day 8

lenten-reflections-on-the-confession-of-belhar“We deliberately and intentionally practice giving ourselves to one another because we realize we belong to each other. We need each other. We are inextricably tied together. We pursue this unity like a brutal physical regimen. It is not something we come by perfectly, all at once. It is terribly messy, awkward, and fully human. In many ways, it brings out our deepest insecurities and vulnerabilities if we are doing it faithfully and hopefully.”
Mihee Kim-Kort
Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar

May I live into unity with all my
mess,
awkwardness,
vulnerability,
insecurity,
and everything I need to be
fully human
and thus
receive faith and hope
for the living of these days.

This Lenten season I am using a new resource to explore the Belhar Confession: Lenten Reflections on the Confession of Belhar, edited by Kerri N. Allen and Donald K. McKim. The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in which I serve as a teaching elder (pastor), added the Confession of Belhar to our Book of Confessions in 2016. This confession came from the Dutch Reformed Mission Church during its historic struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

See you along the Trail.

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The Meaning of Children: Later

My friend Mihee Kim-Kort is hosting a series on her First Day Walking blog that features stories from people in all walks of life and their observations of children and what they make us. Today she honored me by allowing me to share some reflections. Hope I didn’t embarrass anyone. Also, a big shout out to Mihee for calling me “seasoned” as she promoted the post on Twitter.

The Meaning of Children

In May FDW is hosting a new series on  stories from people in all walks of life and their observations of children and what they make us. Click here for more on the series and a list of the contributors. This post was written by friend and colleague Mark Koenig.

Every parent-child relationship is unique. As is every child-parent relationship. And every relationship between or among siblings. And every relationship within the web of family by choice and family by birth.

Affirming that, my words are descriptive, struggling to capture my unique reality. They neither prescribe nor proscribe. If they resonate with anyone else, provide insight or guidance, that’s grace.

I write as the father of two men. My older son is 32; my younger son 27. My sons, at this and every age. My children. Looking back across the years, I find a number of dimensions of meaning in…

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The Meaning of Children: Letter to Jonathan

In May, my friend Mihee Kim-Kort is hosting a series on her blog, First Day Walking, that features stories from people in many walks of life and their observations of children and what they make us. All the posts are amazing. Here, my friend Larissa Kwong Abazia, vice-moderator of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) shares part a letter she is writing to her son Jonathan about facing breast cancer. The courage, grace, faith, hope, and love of Jonathan, Dan, and Larissa move and inspire me.

The Meaning of Children

In May FDW is hosting a new series on  stories from people in all walks of life and their observations of children and what they make us. Click here for more on the series and a list of the contributors. This post was written by my wonderful and beautiful friend Larissa Kwong Abazia. So honored to have her here.

I was diagnosed with breast cancer in February 2015. This is a portion of a letter I’ve been writing to my three year old son, Jonathan.

Dear Jonathan,

I’m writing you this letter trusting that I will be around to see your first day of kindergarten, watch you graduate from high school, and be a part of every single step in-between (and after!).  Writing to you during a time that you may or may not remember is important to me. I want you to know how you are an important part of…

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Reflections Along the Journey: Theological Narratives of Korean American Clergywomen

Grace Ji-Sun Kim and a number of my friends have an exciting project in the works. You can help support this book!

Grace Ji-Sun Kim

book_imageWe are doing a Pubslush Campaign to raise funds to help publish a new book, Reflections Along the Journey: Theological Narratives of Korean American Clergywomen
(Judson Press).

Please help spread the word and please support our publication.  Please go to the original site to donate.  Thank you!!

 

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A prayer for #NMOS14

10604510_1455047228107493_7131459021695901671_oIn response to the killing of Michael Brown and others, people will gather in solidarity across the country on Thursday, August 14, to hold vigils and observe a moment of silence to honor victims of police brutality. Find information about a National Moment of Silence 2014 near you.

For those who are called to prayer at such a time, Mihee Kim-Kort and I offer the following for you to use or adapt or take as a starting point to create a completely different prayer:

Gracious God,
With breaking hearts and aching spirits, we turn to you.
God, have mercy.

Another violent death has torn your human family.
God, have mercy.

Another person of color,
another of your beloved children,
killed too soon.
God, have mercy.

Families, friends weep.
Communities question and rage.
God have mercy.

Have mercy, God.

Guide us
to see each person,
to value each person,
to treat each person,
as your beloved child.

Help us
to remake systems that diminish, divide, deny, and degrade,
to establish and enforce policies of accountability,
to turn from violence,
to end state-sanctioned police brutality and antiblackness.

Draw us together
to allow justice justice to roll like waters,
to permit righteousness to flow like everlasting streams,
to wash over all your children.
All your children.

This day and every day.

With breaking hearts and aching spirits, we turn to you.
God, have mercy.
Amen.

 

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Stand Your Ground: On Marissa Alexander and Fear

My friend Mihee Kim-Kort provides a theological reflection on Marissa Alexander and fear. “The only way I can make sense of those words is the thought of Jesus speaking us into that darkness. We’re the embodiment of those words, ‘Fear not.’” Mihee includes ideas for action. Good stuff as always. I am always grateful when I see a new post from her appear in my email. Yes. That is a gentle suggestion that you go to her blog and subscribe.

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Henry Ossawa Tanneran, an African-American artist, painted The Annunciation in 1898

“What kind of body and performance can adequately represent “fear” in the US judicial system, or in our communities? And why is the proof of fear necessary to assert one’s right to defend one’s life? Racial justice, feminist anti-violence, and anti-prison/policing movements must take the implications of this ruling seriously in order to make their work more relevant to black women’s lives.” -From The Feminist Wire

I remember hearing once that the phrase “Fear not” is found hundreds of time in the Bible. Fear was clearly pervasive in that culture and time period – an oppressive government, economic disparities, and abuse from religious leaders – and then, Jesus comes along. Jesus, with his radical ideas about God’s kingdom and loving enemies, and all those wonderful miracles, Jesus, and his offering the possibility of change in their context, of course, of course, there would…

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Homes

Thoughts of home have filled my last few days.

Or perhaps I should say thoughts about the many homes I know.

video showing clips of movies filmed in Pittsburgh and a photo posted by my friend Mihee Kim-Kort about her family’s recent road trip, reminded me of the home where I grew: Neville Island.

I realized that no matter how much I like New York, where I now live; no matter how much I like Louisville where I spent ten years and where I make many trips for work; no matter how much I like Cleveland Heights where Tricia lives now and we raised our family; no matter how much, and most days how much means a great deal, I will always, always, always bleed black and gold.

S is for SnowBut this week also saw our ministry host a group from First Presbyterian Church of Albuquerque, New Mexico. And in our conversations I found myself longing for Ghost Ranch and Northern New Mexico, the home of my soul, the place where, every time I visit, I know I belong in a way like I belong in no other place on the planet.

Home of my childhood.

Home of my family.

Home of transition.

Home of the present.

Home of my soul.

All precious places. All blur together.

I give thanks for my homes and I pray and work for the day when all people have a safe place to call home.

See you along the Trail.

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