Tag Archives: reconciliation

National Day of Prayer for Reconciliation in South Sudan

Please join the people of South Sudan in prayer for reconciliation in their country.

A National Day of Prayer for Reconciliation in South Sudan will take place on Monday, July 8, 2013, the eve of the anniversary of the country’s independence. Since achieving independence, South Sudan has continued to know conflict: conflict on the border regions with Sudan, conflict between the peoples of South Sudan.

In response to the violence, comes this call for prayer and a plan for the people of the country to pray together. The theme will be lamentation, leading to repentance and personal conversion/transformation. From July 1-7, there will be prayers with different groups (e.g. government, organised forces, women, youth, etc).

On Friday, July 5 the Muslims will take up the prayer in their mosques, and on Sunday, July 7 the Christians will take it up in their churches.

On Monday, July 8, a national time of prayer will be held in the Juba Stadium, and prayer will also take place in each State capital.

The initiative grows out of an awareness of the need for reconciliation in the Republic of South Sudan. H. E. Vice President Riek Machar raised this concern and H. E. President Salva Kiir appointed a Committee for National Healing, Peace and Reconciliation.
Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul of the Episcopal Church of Sudan chairs the committee with Bishop Emeritus Paride Taban of the Roman Catholic Churchas Vice-chair. The Committee includes a number of other Christian and Muslim religious leaders, a representative of each state, and representatives from civil society.

Learn about Presbyterians at work with our sisters and brothers in South Sudan.

Join the Sudan Advocacy Action Forum.

Pray between now and July 8.

Pray on July 8.

Pray after July 8.

May God lead the people of South Sudan to justice, peace, and reconciliation.

See you along the Trail.

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Filed under Current Events, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

A call to prayer for Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela, child of God, lies  ill in a South African hospital. The Council for a Parliament of the World’s Religions has issued a call to prayer for Nelson Mandela.

In the words of the Council, Nelson Mandela:

helped a generation of young people find a voice for justice. He believed in the humanity of the other to the extent of engaging his own captors in conversations. He transformed an armed movement into a peaceful victory. He successfully established a process of forgiveness and reconciliation instead of revenge.

In our own fashion, each of us may pray.

As for me: I give thanks for Nelson Mandela; for his life and courage and grace and vision and witness. I pray for his comfort and strength. I pray for his family and friends who gather with him at this time. I pray for those who care for him. I pray for people who supported Mandela during the struggle for justice in South Africa and for people who draw inspiration from him to sustain ongoing efforts for justice around the world. I pray for South Africa. Nkosi sikelel’ iAfrika. God bless Nelson Mandela.

See you along the Trail.

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Filed under Current Events, Human Rights

The Second Meeting – advance screening

Check out this movie that my friends at the Center at West Park will screen.

The Center at West Park

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NEW YORK, NY (September 24, 2012)– The advanced screening of a new documentary by Optimistic Film, The Second Meeting, will debut in New York City on Saturday, October 13, 2012, at West Park Presbyterian Church. Immediately following, there will be a panel discussion featuring the subjects of the film, U.S. Air Force pilot Lt. Colonel Dale Zelko and Yugoslav missile officer Colonel Zoltan Dani.

The Second Meeting follows Lt. Col Zelko’s journey back to Serbia to meet Col. Dani, 12 years after the first meeting of the pilot and missile officer who commanded the Yugoslav missile battery that shot down Zelko’s F117A Stealth fighter in 1999. “I had the remarkable opportunity to have a second chance at experiencing Serbia and her people and I will forever be deeply grateful, enriched, and blessed by it,” said Lt. Col Zelko of the experience.

The advanced screening will be the first showing…

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Preparing for execution in Texas

Too long has passed since I have written about death penalty cases. I grieve the executions I have missed and give thanks for those who have raised their voices against the them.

The State of Texas is scheduled to execute Cleve Foster on Tuesday for his role in the abduction and slaying of Nyaneur Pal a decade ago near Fort Worth. Twice before his execution has come close. Each time he received a reprieve. He maintains his innocence.

Foster and a companion, Sheldon Ward, were convicted of fatally shooting Pal. She seen talking with Foster and Ward at a Fort Worth bar. Evidence indicated that she had been raped and shot in the head.

A gun identified as the murder weapon was found in a motel room where Foster and Ward were living. Authorities determined the same gun was used two months earlier to kill another woman, 22-year-old Rachel Urnosky, at her Fort Worth apartment. She also had been raped.

“Foster and Ward were implicated but never tried in her slaying.

Foster blames Pal’s death on Ward. At his trial, Prosecutors argued that “evidence showed Foster actively participated in the woman’s killing, offered no credible explanations, lied and gave contradictory stories about his sexual activities with Pal.

I grieve for Nyaneur Pal and for her family and friends. Her death is a tragedy – an obscenity – as is the death of Rachel Urnosky. Their deaths diminish us all.

However, executing Cleve Foster will not bring Nyaneur back. It will be act of vengeance; it will preclude possible reconciliation. It may even prevent the truth from coming out.

Executions do not reverse horrible crimes. Violence begets violence. We have alternatives.

See you along the Trail.

 

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Filed under Capital Punishment, Death Penalty, Human Rights