Act for peace for Korea

Act for peace on the Korean Peninsula – sign the petition asking the U.S. government to enter negotiations for a peace treaty. 0001-42

On July 27, 1953, the guns fell silent on the Korean peninsula. An armistice brought three years of war to an end. However, a peace treaty has never replaced this cease fire.

Tensions remain between the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. At times tensions heighten. Periodically they boil over into violent clashes. The continuing conflict diverts precious resources from the welfare of the people on both sides of the Demilitarized Zone.

The United States holds a special responsibility for a peaceful resolution of the conflict as it occupied the southern part of the peninsula in 1945 and signed the armistice in 1953. The United States maintains a military presence in the Republic of Korea. Joint military exercises fuel the tension with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

Churches in the Republic of Korea, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korean, the United States, and around the world have joined a campaign to call President Obama and Congress to enter negotiations now for a Korean peace treaty, without conditions, to replace the armistice agreement.

The Korean Peninsula has known separation and conflict since 1945. It is time, it is past time, for peace for Korea.

Sign the petition asking the U.S. government to enter negotiations for a peace treaty. Invite your friends to join you. Let’s give peace a chance.

 

 

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3 Comments

Filed under Current Events, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

3 responses to “Act for peace for Korea

  1. There will never be peace in the Korean peninsula as long as there is a Demonic Monster in power in the North. The only peace that he will except is a total surrender of the South where he rules all.

  2. Reblogged this on Truth Troubles: Why people hate the truths' of the real world and commented:
    There will never be peace in the Korean peninsula as long as there is a Demonic Monster in power in the North. The only peace that he will except is a total surrender of the South where he rules all.

  3. There are certainly issues with the head of the government in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). Peace will be difficult to achieve. However, churches in both the DPRK and the People’s Republic of Korea (ROK) are involved in conversations for peace and they are behind this call. While the DPRK leadership provides challenges, so do the joint military exercises by the U.S. and the ROK. But peace always takes work and sacrifice and risk. I never thought the Berlin Wall would come down. I never thought Nelson Mandela would be elected president of South Africa. Both those happened. Neither was easy and work remains in South Africa and in the countries formerly under the domination of the Soviet Union. Peace on the Korean Peninsula will not come easily. But too often when I and others have said “never”, a way has been made.

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