25 May 2013 Orange Day

photo (5)As part of an international effort to end violence against women and girls, I wear orange (even if the shirt is a bit wrinkled) today as I have on the 25th of each month for nearly a year. I also tweet personally and professionally. Each month, I find other actions to take. Here’s the information so that you may join me.

The Secretary-General’s UNiTE to End Violence against Women campaign proclaims every 25th of the month as Orange Day! The first in a series of Orange Days was launched on 25 July last year.

Initiated and led by the UNiTE campaign Global Youth Network, the action strives to highlight the issue of violence against women and girls, not only once a year, on 25 November (International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women), but every month. Orange Day aims to spark worldwide interest and conversation, highlight the fact that violence against women and girls is a violation of human rights and call for its eradication without reservation, equivocation or delay.

This year we’ll be using our Orange Day actions to highlight recommendations from the agreed conclusions of the 57th session of the Commission on the Status of Women(CSW57) and in the framework of ‘safe spaces for women and girls’.  In May, the campaign will focus on ‘Safe Homes for Women and Girls’.  

VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND GIRLS IN THE HOME 

Many women and girls face violence in the very place they should feel the safest – in their homes. Violence against women and girls in the home takes place in all countries of the world and may manifest itself in different forms depending on the context. It can occur at the hands of intimate partners or family members.

The costs of violence against women and girls in the home are extremely high. They include the terrible suffering of survivors and others within the household, direct costs of services to treat and support women and girls who have faced abuse, as well as the costs of bringing perpetrators to justice. They may also include the cost of lost education, employment and productivity. Witnessing domestic violence can also impact children’s development, both during childhood and later in life.

FAST FACTS

  • The most common form of violence experienced by women globally is physical violence inflicted by an intimate partner, with women beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused.
  • Several global surveys suggest that half of all women who die from homicide are killed by their current or former husbands or partners.
  • The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) estimates that the annual worldwide number of so-called “honour killing” victims may be as high as 5,000 women.
  • Women aged 15-44 have a greater risk of being a victim of rape and domestic violence than of suffering from cancer, car accidents, war and malaria, according to World Bank data.
  • More than 60 million girls worldwide married before the age of 18, primarily in South Asia (31.1million) and Sub-Saharan Africa (14.1 million).

ORANGE DAY ACTION: WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Many governments made commitments to end violence against women and girls in the home prior to and during the 57th Session of the CSW. Ensure that this momentum is maintained throughout the year, and results in real change.

ACTION 1: Fifty-seven governments made specific commitments to take concrete steps towards ending violence against women as part of the COMMIT initiative. Find out if yours was one of them:  http://saynotoviolence.org/commit

ACTION 2: The Handbook for Legislation on Violence Against Women and the Handbook for National Action Plans for Violence Against Women are resources which respectively illustrate a model framework for legislation on violence against women and provide guidance for policy makers and advocates to form effective plans to end violence against women and girls. Please disseminate these hand books as widely as possible.

ACTION 3: Promote this Orange Day using social media – find below suggested tweets and Facebook messages:

Sample tweets

  • After #CSW57 to #endVAW &girls, this #orangeday UNiTE campaign says: #Safehomes for women & girls! http://owl.li/km1BB
  • Today is the UNiTE campaign’s #orangeday! Wear orange & @SayNO_UNiTE to end #violenceagainstwomen in the home! http://owl.li/km1BB
  • On #orangeday 25 May, support UNiTE campaign & find out how to advocate for #safehomes for women&girls http://owl.li/km1BB
  • This #orangeday advocate for #safehomes for women&girls. Take action. Support UNiTE campaign and wear orange http://owl.li/km1BB
  • Today is UNiTE #orangeday! Find out what commitments govts have made to end #VAW in the home.http://saynotoviolence.org/commit #SayUcommit 

Facebook messages

1. “The 25th of each month is Orange Day – a day to take action to end violence against women and girls. Each month this year the UNiTE campaign will highlight recommendations from the 57th session of the Commission on the Status of Women to ensure that its conclusions become reality. This month we highlight violence against women and girls in the home. Find out what you can do to make homes safe for women and girls.” http://owl.li/kS5BG

2. “Today is Orange Day – a day to take action against violence against women and girls. This month the UNiTE campaign is highlighting violence against women and girls in the home.  The Handbook for Legislation on Violence against Women and the Handbook for National Action Plans for Violence against Women are resources which provide policy makers and advocate with guidance on how to form effective actions plans and create legislation to end violence against women. Share these tools!” http://owl.li/kS6fC

3. “This Orange Day the UNiTE campaign highlights the global issue of violence against women and girls in the home.  57 governments have committed to take specific steps to address violence against women and girls. Find out what they’ve promised to do!”http://saynotoviolence.org/commit

See you along the (hopefully soon safer) Trail

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Filed under Human Rights, Presbyterian Ministry at the United Nations, United Nations

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