Writing down words

An interchange from the movie Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade remains with me. Indiana (Harrison Ford) and his father Professor Henry Jones (Sean Connery) seek the Holy Grail. Nazis have also joined the quest. Henry Jones has long sought the Grail, finding a map and compiling a diary. To keep them safe, Henry sent the materials to his son and colleague Marcus Brody. Learning that the Nazis have kidnapped Henry Jones, Brody set off with the map.  Indiana went to rescue his father. After a series of adventures, father and son escape. The following conversation occurs:

Professor Henry Jones: Stop, wait, stop! Stop! You’re going the wrong way. We have to get to Berlin.
Indiana Jones: Brody’s this way.
Professor Henry Jones: My diary’s in Berlin.
Indiana Jones: We don’t need the diary, dad; Marcus has the map.
Professor Henry Jones: There is more in the diary than just the map.
Indiana Jones: All right, Dad. Tell me.
Professor Henry Jones: Well, he who finds the Grail must face the final challenge.
Indiana Jones: What final challenge?
Professor Henry Jones: Three devices of lethal cunning.
Indiana Jones: Booby traps?
Professor Henry Jones: Oh, yes. But I found the clues that will safely take us through them in the Chronicles of St. Anselm.
Indiana Jones: Well, what are they? As his father sits silently, Indiana continues in an annoyed voice. Can’t you remember?
Professor Henry Jones: I wrote them down in my diary so that I wouldn’t have to remember.

I have always found wisdom in Henry Jones’ plan. I find more as I grow older. Redeeming the Pastby Father Michael Lapsley, is one of several books I am reading.

photo (7) (768x1024)An Anglican priest, Father Lapsley took an active role in the struggle against South Africa’s apartheid. In 1990, he opened a letter bomb that nearly killed him. The blast took his hands and one of his eyes. His book tells his story of the faith journey that led him to pursue justice, the explosion, his recovery, and how Father Lapsley has drawn on his experience of trauma to help his sisters and brothers in South Africa and around the world seek healing.

Many of his words bear repeating and remembering. I write down a few:

 As we who are disabled demand a place in the sun, we are not just asking people to be nice to us; we are saying, “Actually you can’t be a real community without us.” We don’t ask for pity; we ask for justice. We say, “Don’t just include us in your community. Instead, come, let’s create one together.” That’s a very different concept.

Profound, challenging, humbling, hopeful words. Words that apply in so many situations – in any situation of privilege and oppression and exclusion. Words to ponder, to remember, and to seek to live by.

We cannot be a real community until everyone is a part and we build that community together. May it be so.

See you along the Trail.

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4 Comments

Filed under Books, Human Rights, Movie

4 responses to “Writing down words

  1. Believer

    Inspiring!

  2. Thanks. I am only part way through his book. I look forward to more insights.

    • Believer

      I will be looking forward to reading more about this amazing man. I needed to read something inspiring after hanging around The Huffington Post (it’s hard putting yourself out there), but at least I need to keep it real. Have a great weekend!

  3. peng leong

    Very thought provoking indeed.
    The conncept of building a new community in which everyone has a part to play is a healthy concept

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